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Big-name tech firms like Amazon, Google, Meta and Microsoft are undergoing mass layoffs, but job prospects for applicants in the broader tech ecosystem are poised to be among the best of any industry in 2023, according to a new ranking. Eight of the top 10 “best jobs” in the U.S. this year are technology roles, according to Indeed, which conducts an annual list of the top roles for job seekers....
These days, it feels like there’s a type of  Hunger Games  in the districts of software engineers and financial analysts. But despite the carnage at Twitter or Goldman Sachs, which make the job market seem like a sinking ship, the reality isn’t as bleak as it seems: Unemployment is still fairly low and, so far, the number of layoffs remains lower than they were pre-pandemic. READ MORE AT YAHOO FINANCE
If you’ve been applying to jobs and not getting interviews or offers, you may not be selling yourself enough. You can have the greatest resume or speak brilliantly in an interview, but if you don’t sell yourself, it can often be the difference between getting a job offer or not. READ MORE AT HBR
US News analyzed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to rank jobs by hiring demand, growth, median salary, employment rate, future job prospects, stress level and work-life balance. Software developer tops the list according to US News, despite mass layoffs at companies like Meta, Salesforce and Amazon. For those looking for job security, consider health care. READ MORE AT BLOOMBERG  
A new year is here, and with it, a new workplace phenomenon that bosses and employees should prepare for: quiet hiring.  Quiet hiring is when an organization acquires new skills without actually hiring new full-time employees, says Emily Rose McRae, who has led Gartner’s future of work research team since its 2019 inception, focusing on HR practices. Sometimes, it means hiring short-term  ...
Rejection can be a tough pill to swallow, especially when it comes directly from your boss.Debby Soo, CEO of restaurant reservation service OpenTable, knows the feeling. Like many others, she’s received countless “no’s” throughout her career before finally landing promotions or new positions, she says. Those rejections have helped her identify a reliable formula for turning a no from your boss “into...
The U.S. workforce has millions of employees that cling to jobs they hate. Some stay due to comfort, as most become accustomed to salary and benefits along with fearing unsteady income. It makes sense when you consider that 63% of Americans don't have $500 of savings to cover an emergency, according to a survey from Bankrate.com. Some who consider switching jobs rightfully fear discrimination in the job market — be it race, age or...
As a result of the pandemic-driven shift to remote work, the work-from-home opportunities have multiplied ten-fold. A remote career has its own sets of benefits, including flexibility to work from anywhere, work-life balance, higher productivity, relaxed and comfortable working space, and more. READ MORE AT MUO
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the number of Hispanic workers in the labor force has grown from 10 million in 1990 to 29 million in 2020. By 2030, Hispanics are expected to account for one out of five workers. Hispanics are represented more in the labor force compared to others because they tend to be younger and in the prime age working group, 25-54 years old, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics....
Some sectors bounced back to pre-pandemic levels faster than others, as evidenced by this nifty chart comparing details of the April 2022 jobs report to February 2020 . The big picture:  The total number of U.S. jobs hasn’t yet climbed back to pre-pandemic levels. But underneath the headline, areas of the economy like professional services, or transportation and warehousing, have recovered any ground they lost in the pandemic...
Between the switch to working from home and uncertainty about whether our jobs would survive the pandemic, our professional lives have been under some serious strain. It’s not helped matters that lockdowns and border closures have made it difficult to take a holiday and recharge. The pandemic has fundamentally altered our work patterns. It has also shifted our expectations about where, when and how we want to get the job done. READ...
As we emerge from the pandemic, thousands of jobseekers are being held back by imposter syndrome. According to latest research, 85 per cent of us have felt incompetent at work, with women more likely to suffer than men. READ MORE AT THE SUN